Most of the relatives of a Franklin Township woman who live in the Philippines were spared the wrath of Typhoon Haiyan on Friday.

The typhoon killed as many as 10,000 Philippine residents. It displaced about 800,000 others, according to wire reports.

Jean Andrews, wife of Alan Andrews, is a native of the Philippines. All her relatives, including her parents and siblings, still reside on the island country.

She said she received word that her siblings are safe, but still hasn't learned about the fate of her parents.

Typhoon Haiyan struck parts of the island with the force of a Category 5 hurricane. Winds were estimated as high as 195 miles per hour.

The brick-and-mortar structures schools, churches, and government buildings were simply no match for the jet-force winds and massive walls of waves that swept ashore Friday, devastating cities, towns and villages and killing thousands, including many of those who had huddled in government shelters.

Jean is originally from the island of Cebu. Her family still lives there.

Alan, who has been to Cebu with Jean, said, "This is a huge island; however, the typhoon did hit Cebu, but it hit other areas worse.

"Jean has not heard a word regarding her parents, yet," Alan said. "The siblings are all fine as of now. The parents live seven hours away from the family high in the mountains in a community called Marmol, Tuburan."

Bernita Leibenguth of Tamaqua has been in touch with her family, who lives outside of Zamboanga City in the southern part of the Philippines.

"We're lucky our family was not part of the area affected," her son Andy Leibenguth said. "We're still waiting for news of our friends.

Bernita's entire family lives in the Philippines and was actually affected by flooding a month ago but was spared this time.

Bernita and her husband John plan to travel to the Philippines to check in on relatives at the end of the month.