A new report released earlier this week on government waste was enough to give anyone indigestion over the Christmas holiday.

In a time when citizens are more tuned in to how their tax dollars are being spent, you would think the federal agencies would be watching their bottom lines. Oklahoma Sen. Tom Coburn says his latest report, which contains $30 billion of unnecessary spending, proves to the people that Washington would much rather borrow money than cut spending and shows why the American people have lost confidence in government.

"Washington has reversed the wisdom of the old cliche that less is needed when less is wasted," Coburn stated in the report. "Every branch of government bickered this year over the need to spend more (while continuing to misspend) with an attitude of 'waste more, want more!

Near the top of Coburn's list of wasteful projects was $319 million initially spent building the defective ObamaCare Web site. Add to that the $684 million advertising campaign to get Americans to visit the site and then enroll in government health care and you can see why the response has been so negative.

The biggest wasteful item on the list is the more than $7 billion worth of equipment in Afghanistan which the military has decided to simply destroy rather than ship back home to sell or give away.

Another defense item concerns the Fort Hood shooter who allegedly killed 13 and injured 32 in 2009. While Major Nadal Hasan continued to collect government paychecks - totalling over $278,000 in military benefits the families of the survivors and victims had to fight to receive any compensation.

The list also includes $5 million the State Department paid for hand-blown crystal stemware, just days before the government shutdown; $1.5 million spent by the FBI each year to educate Hollywood producers and writers on how to portray the agency in movies; and $10 million for Army National Guard recruitment adds to be shown during the latest Superman movie. This occurred while plans were being made to cut the strength of the Guard by 8,000 soldiers.

Is it any wonder why federal bureaucrats consistently receive low polling numbers with the public?

By Jim Zbick

editor@tnonline.com