Here's a snapshot of some key findings from a National Center for Health Statistics survey on the prevalence of obesity in the United States:

*In 2009–2010, 35.7 percent of U.S. adults were obese.

*In 2009–2010, 16.9 percent of U.S. children and adolescents were obese.

*In 2009–2010, over 78 million U.S. adults and about 12.5 million U.S. children and adolescents were obese.

*Between 1999–2000 and 2009–2010, the prevalence of obesity increased among men but not among women.

*Between 1999–2000 and 2009–2010, there was an increase in the prevalence of obesity among boys, but not among girls.

The study also found that differences in the prevalence of obesity between men and women lessened between 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, with the prevalence of obesity among men reaching the same level as that among women.

Also, age differences in obesity prevalence varied between men and women. The prevalence of obesity was higher among older women compared with younger women, but there was no difference by age in obesity prevalence among men. Among children and adolescents, the prevalence of obesity was higher among adolescents than among preschool-aged children.

There has been no change in obesity prevalence in recent years; however, over the last decade there has been a significant increase in obesity prevalence among men and boys but not among women and girls overall. The Healthy People 2010 goals of 15 percent obesity among adults and 5 percent obesity among children were not met.