A state Commonwealth Court judge on Tuesday determined that the requirement that Pennsylvania voters show a valid photo ID will not be in place for the Nov. 6 presidential election, a victory for opponents of the law.

Here are the major provisions of Judge Robert Simpson's 16-page ruling:

VOTERS WON'T NEED PHOTO ID

Simpson issued an injunction against provisions of the law that would keep people from voting if they don't have photo identification. Those voters will not be required to follow an alternative procedure in which they would vote by a provisional ballot and then prove their identity to county election officials within six days of the election. Instead, they will vote the same as others.

THE RULING ONLY EXTENDS TO THE COMING ELECTION

The legal challenge to the law will continue before Simpson, with a status conference set for Dec. 13 in Harrisburg.

JUDGE SAID THE LAW COULDDISENFRANCHISE SOME VOTERS

Simpson said that with five weeks to go before the election, some people who would need photo IDs to vote might not get them in time.

VOTER EDUCATION ABOUT PHOTO ID WILL CONTINUE

Opponents sought a ban on outreach and educational efforts regarding the need for photo ID. Simpson denied that request.

OFFICIALS MAY STILL ASK FOR ID AT THE POLLS

As occurred in the spring primary, voters can be asked for photo ID, but if they don't have one, they won't be kept from voting.

WHAT'S AT STAKE

Supporters of the law framed it as a means to prevent voter fraud, and a key state House Republican lawmaker predicted it would be critical to helping presidential candidate Mitt Romney win the state. Opponents said it would result in qualified voters being unable to cast ballots that are counted.

Online:

The ruling: http://bit.ly/R9zuhA