A company that specializes in energy savings wants to help Carbon County's prison save money.

During the monthly meeting of the Carbon County Prison Board, Kirk F. Lysek, an energy consultant for Grainger, approached the board with a proposal to help save money on the electric bills at the prison by retrofitting the facility with new light bulbs.

Lysek said the fluorescent bulbs currently used are being discontinued so something has to be done no matter what; but right now power companies and the federal government are offering incentives and discounts for companies that make the switch to new, more efficient bulbs.

The cost to retrofit the prison comes in at just under $39,000 after the incentives and rebates.

He noted that he conducted an audit of the energy used at the facility and showed that in five years, the prison could see savings of close to $87,000 or nearly $2,000 a month. Currently, the prison's monthly electric bill averages close to $6,000.

The board discussed the options briefly and asked if Lysek could provide a proposal on also retrofitting the exterior lights of the facility. The information will now be sent to the county and further discussion will take place.

No action was taken at this time.

In other matters, the board approved the new women's health care policy for the facility.

Warden Joseph Gross also updated the board on booking fees and LiveScan fee collections for the months of September and October.

He explained that the $25 booking fees are being collected at least half the time.

In the LiveScan fees, Robert Crampsie, chairman of the prison board, pointed out that on average, the county is now collecting around $4,200 in LiveScan fees, which is significantly higher than earlier this year.

The board also discussed a letter from Congressman Lou Barletta regarding getting the prison recertified to temporarily house illegal immigrants.

Commissioner Wayne Nothstein said he has spoken to officials and is hoping to get a meeting set up to discuss the matter further.