The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture.

Benefits of listing on the National Register

Cultural

Ÿ Designation enhances community self esteem

Ÿ Fosters respect and appreciation of the community's heritage

Ÿ Documents historic resources, such as buildings, structures, statues and significant objects in the historic and cultural life of the community

Ÿ Provides photographic inventory, baseline mapping and bibliographic information of properties in the district for education, promotion, marketing and heritage tourism development

Economic

Ÿ A tool for revitalization of older commercial areas and attraction of new business

Ÿ Identifies properties whose owners may be eligible for various kinds of Federal, State, and local assistance

Ÿ Individual property owners may be eligible for Federal income tax credits for certified historic rehabilitation projects if they follow the process. Federal 20-percent Investment Tax Credit for rehabilitation of income producing properties (residential rental, commercial, industrial, etc.).

Ÿ Eligibility for State grants as Keystone Historic Preservation Grants (50/50 matching grant) for publicity or nonprofit owned properties, including churches.

Ÿ A great marketing took for selling homes and commercial buildings in the district.

Ÿ Provides photographic inventory, and baseline mapping of historic district properties for community planning and economic development purposes.

Ÿ Neighborhood stability and retention or increase in property values.

Ÿ A tool for promoting heritage tourism development in your community.

Protective

Ÿ Provides a measure of protection for the impacts of federally funded, federally licenses, and federally assisted projects (defined under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966).

Ÿ Eligible buildings and properties may qualify for State and Federal grants for historic preservation.

Common misconceptions about National Register designation

Listing on the National Register places no restrictions on private property owners unless they seek to use State or Federal funding in conjunction with the property. Private property owners may do whatever they wish with their property, including demolition. Private property owners are not required to paint their homes or businesses in historic colors. Restrictions such as these only arise if a local Historic District Ordinance is enacted, and the local community chooses to regulate properties within the district.