Ronald Blisard of Nesquehoning has received an appointment by Gov. Tom Corbett to the Pennsylvania Workforce Investment Board.

Blisard was one of nearly two dozen new members appointed to the board. Rep. Doyle Heffley (R-Carbon) applauded the governor's appointment of Blisard, who has more than 40 years of professional and leadership experience in various lines of corporate work.

"During this time of economic downturn, we need people like Ron on board to work to keep jobs in Pennsylvania and improving the state's business climate to attract new employers and start their businesses here," said Heffley.

"With the start of the new year, I believe a fresh outlook and expertise given by the board members is a critical step in positively changing the Commonwealth's economic outlook."

The board is designed to act as a workforce policy adviser to the governor, helping to develop a workforce system that operates in conjunction with the administration's economic and education goals and priorities.

The board also works to ensure that the needs of both employers and workers are met and provides policy guidance and gives recommendations on how to improve Pennsylvania's work force system.

Board members are appointed by the governor and represent a cross-section of business executives, labor officials, education leaders, economic development practitioners and local elected officials.

Additionally, the cabinet secretaries of five state agencies, as well as four members of the General Assembly, serve on the board.

Blisard is no stranger to workforce investment boards, as he currently serves as vice chairman on the Pocono Counties Workforce Investment Board and has held other positions including chairman on the Pocono Counties Workforce Investment Board and secretary of Pennsylvania Association of Workforce Investment Board.

Blisard said he's eager to bring to the board the experience he has in the private industry workforce.

"I plan to address the problems private industries have with government putting regulations on them that makes it more difficult for them to stay in business," said Blisard.