Any shock to the nervous system is cause for concern, and should not be handled lightly.

Which is why Palmerton Area School District and the Palmerton Football Parents Club have teamed together to sponsor a concussion seminar hosted by OAA Orthopaedics Specialists of Allentown.

The seminar will be from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, May 3, in the high school auditorium. It will focus on current concepts in concussion management, from injury to return-to-play.

Presentation speakers will include Mark Brayford, DO, Medical Director; OAA Orthopaedic Specialists ImPACT Testing Team, Return-to-Play guidelines; and Scott Brayford, PA-C.

Superintendent Carol Boyce said the seminar will better help inform students and parents of the health risks associated with concussions.

"It is one of the big topics in education news and student athletics, and also in the world of medicine," Boyce said. "The society has become increasingly aware of concussions, their treatments, the aftermath, and, for students, how do we respond and assist them in their future endeavors in the classroom."

Boyce said concussions can lead to traumatic brain injuries, and added that "with all of that becoming much more highly publicized, we decided collectively, the football parents and district, to co-host the seminar hosted by OAA of Allentown."

Two years ago the district entered into the ImPACT program with OAA, Boyce said.

"Mark and Steve Brayford of OAA were very instrumental in coming to the [school] board and presenting," she said. "As a follow-up, we've determined it's a good time to share with the public what the impact of concussions could be on youngsters, how they occur, physically what happens to the body, what's the treatment, and what can be expected from a concussion patient to move forward."

Boyce said there will be two programs: the one on May 3, which she said is more geared toward students of any age; and the second, an ACT 80 Day on May 4, that will be directed toward the district's teaching staff.

She said the May 3 session is free and open to the public, and encouraged visitors to attend. There will be a question-and-answer session as well, Boyce said.

"We would like to provide the service for the community helping all of us to know what it is, how to deal with it, how it's treated, and what we can expect," she said. "I think we are better able to identity the symptoms, because medical science and medical treatment has become so much more advanced, and these issues are coming more in front of our consciousness."