For those of the Jewish faith, Rosh Hashanah begins this evening at sundown and continues until Friday evening.

Rosh Hashanah begins the 10-day period for the Jewish New Year on the first of Tishrei, and concludes with Yom Kippur on the 10th of Tishrei.

Yom Kippur is a day for Jews to become reunited with God and their fellow men, and to make atonement for their sins.

According to the Chabad.org of Jewish High Holidays, "Rosh Hashanah means, 'Head of the Year,' and as its name indicates, it is the beginning of the Jewish year."

Much of the day is spent in synagogue during this period.

The shofar, or ram's horn, is sounded on both days of the holiday and "represents the trumpet blast of a people's coronation of their king."

Rosh Hashanah also represents the anniversary of man's first sin and his repentance. It is marked by the eating of a piece of apple dipped in honey. This symbolizes the desire for a sweet year.

On Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, Jews are to forego all physical pleasures, including eating and drinking and subject themselves to a vigorous and soul-searching introspection of themselves and their lifestyle.