THE DOG DAYS OF LATE SUMMER PRODUCED SOME BIZARRE CRIMES IN THE REGION IN 1911. IN DESCRIBING ONE SHOOTING INCIDENT IN MOUNT CARMEL, A REPORTER FROM THE TAMAQUA COURIER DESCRIBED THE SCENE AS SOMETHING REMINISCENT OF THE WILD WEST IN ITS "WOOLIEST DAYS."

THAT INCIDENT BEGAN AT A BOARDING HOUSE WHERE A MAN NAMED ALEX KABULIC WAS STAYING. ALEX WAS OFTEN MADE THE BUTT OF JOKES BY OTHER BOARDERS AND ONE DAY, AFTER AN AFTERNOON OF DRINKING, HE LASHED BACK WITH A VENGEANCE. RETURNING HOME DRUNK, HE GRABBED TWO REVOLVERS AND SOUGHT OUT ONE OF HIS ANTAGONISTS – PETER MASHEFSA, WHOM HE SHOT IN THE STOMACH.

BARRICADING HIMSELF IN HIS ROOM, HE KEPT POLICE AT BAY BY FIRING SOME SHOTS THROUGH THE DOOR. ONE BULLET TOOK OFF A FINGER OF THE POLICE CHIEF.

AFTER STATE POLICE MADE AN ASSAULT ON THE HOME, THEY FOUND KABULIC'S LIFELESS BODY. HE HAD TAKEN HIS OWN LIFE WITH HIS LAST BULLET.

IN CARBON COUNTY, A POLICE PURSUIT AND ACCOMPANYING GUNFIGHT CAUSED SOME "WILD EXCITEMENT" IN LANSFORD ON SEPT. 22. FRANCIS MCLAUGHLIN OF LANSFORD WAS SUSPECTED OF STEALING AN OVERCOAT FROM J. A. MANDOUR'S AUTOMOBILE WHILE IT WAS PARKED IN FRONT OF WENZEL'S CAFE.

WHILE PATROLLING, LANSFORD POLICE CHIEF EHRIG SAW MCLAUGHLIN, WHO WAS WANTED ON A WARRANT, DUCK AROUND A CORNER AND THEN FLEE ON FOOT. THE CHIEF YELLED AT HIM TO STOP BUT, BEING A "GOOD SPRINTER," THE SUSPECT WAS ABLE TO OUTDISTANCE THE CHIEF.

"IT WAS THEN THAT THE CHIEF WHIPPED OUT HIS REVOLVER AND SENT SEVERAL SHOTS FLYING AFTER HIM," THE REPORTER STATED. "HOWEVER, AS THE STREET WAS DARK AND THE MAN WAS FAR AHEAD, THEY FAILED TO BRING HIM TO EARTH."

A FEW HOURS LATER, THE CHIEF FOUND THE SUSPECT HIDING ON ARLINGTON STREET. HE QUICKLY SURRENDERED AND WAS TAKEN TO THE COUNTY JAIL.

IN POTTSVILLE EARLIER IN THE MONTH ANOTHER FOOT PURSUIT OF A SUSPECT BY AN OFF-DUTY STATE POLICEMAN ENDED MORE VIOLENTLY.

STATE POLICE OFFICER WILLIAM GASKIN WAS WALKING DOWN THE STREET WHEN HE NOTICED TWO MEN WITH SUITCASES HEADING FOR THE READING STATION. AWARE THAT A PAIR OF MEN WERE WANTED FOR A ROBBERY IN WILKES-BARRE, THE TROOPER ASKED THEM TO PRODUCE IDENTIFICATION AND OPEN THEIR SUITCASES.

WHEN THEY REFUSED, A SCUFFLE BROKE OUT AND ONE OF THE MEN STARTED TO RUN. GASKIN PULLED OUT HIS REVOLVER AND FIRED A WARNING SHOT IN THE AIR. WHEN THE SUSPECT FAILED TO STOP, THE TROOPER FIRED A SECOND BULLET, THIS ONE WOUNDING THE MAN IN THE LEG.

AFTER LATER INTERROGATION, HOWEVER, THE TWO SUSPECTS WERE CLEARED OF CRIMINAL ACTIVITY. INSTEAD, IT WAS GASKIN WHO FOUND HIMSELF IN TROUBLE.

THE TROOPER WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE POLICE SERVICE FOR "DISOBEYING ORDERS AND EXCEEDING HIS AUTHORITY." HE WAS ALSO ARRESTED AND PLACED IN JAIL ON CHARGES OF AGGRAVATED ASSAULT AND BATTERY.

IN STROUDSBURG IN LATE AUGUST, A TEENAGE LOVE TRIANGLE ENDED IN A SHOOTING. GEORGE BELLIS, 14, AND HARVEY OSBORN, 15, WERE REPORTEDLY BOTH INTERESTED IN THE SAME YOUNG GIRL WHO WAS STAYING WITH THE BELLIS FAMILY.

OSBORN THREATENED TO SHOOT BELLIS IF HE REVEALED INFORMATION THAT THE GIRL ALLEGEDLY SAID ABOUT HIM. HE CARRIED OUT HIS THREAT BY SHOOTING BELLIS WHO WAS STANDING AT THE TOP OF A STAIRCASE IN HIS HOME.

THE FOLLOWING MONTH, A SHENANDOAH PRIEST BECAME THE SUBJECT OF A WILD INCIDENT.

THE REV. RICHARD J. BANTON, ACTING PASTOR OF THE ANNUNCIATION CHURCH, WAS RETURNING HOME FROM A SICK CALL LATE AT NIGHT WHEN HE NOTICED THREE STRANGERS LOITERING NEAR THE RECTORY. HE BECAME SUSPICIOUS, ESPECIALLY SINCE A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF MONEY HAD BEEN RAISED FROM RECENT CHURCH SOCIALS HELD ON THE RECTORY LAWN.

AT 1 A.M. HE HEARD A SUSPICIOUS NOISE DOWNSTAIRS, GOT HIS REVOLVER AND WENT TO INVESTIGATE. WHEN HE REACHED THE BOTTOM OF THE STEPS, HE CAUGHT A GLIMPSE OF SOMEONE DASHING OUT THE KITCHEN DOOR.

HE FIRED AT THE FLEEING MAN BUT MISSED. RUSHING OUTSIDE, HE SAW TWO OTHER FIGURES DASH THROUGH THE YARD BUT DID NOT FIRE HIS GUN, FEARING THAT A STRAY BULLET COULD CAUSE MORE HARM.

AN INVESTIGATION SHOWED THAT THE ROBBERS HAD ATTEMPTED TO OPEN THE SAFE, WHICH CONTAINED $2,000.

IN MID-SEPTEMBER, AN " INSANE JEALOUS FATHER" WAS CHARGED WITH WOUNDING HIS DAUGHTER DURING AN UGLY AFFAIR IN PHILADELPHIA.

MAY SCHACHTS WAS LEAVING WORK IN A HOSIERY FACTORY WHEN SHE WAS GRABBED BY HER FATHER GEORGE. HE THEN DREW A RUSTY REVOLVER, AND YELLED "LIFE OR DEATH!"

THE GIRL SOMEHOW WRENCHED FREE BUT ONE OF THE FOUR SHOTS HER FATHER HAD FIRED STRUCK HER IN THE BACK. SOME OF HER CO-WORKERS CAME TO HER ASSISTANCE AND MANAGED TO WALK HER HOME.

A CROWD THAT HAD MASSED, MEANWHILE, ANGRILY TURNED ON THE FATHER WHO WAS STILL CARRYING HIS REVOLVER. HE WAS SOON OVERPOWERED BY THE MOB AND ONLY INTERVENTION OF A POLICEMAN SAVED HIM FOR A SEVERE BEATING OR EVEN DEATH.

THE MAN'S WIFE LATER TOLD AUTHORITIES HIS ACTIONS WERE CAUSED BY "JEALOUSY OF THE DAUGHTER" BUT SHE DECLINED TO EXPLAIN WHAT SHE MEANT BY THAT PHRASE.