The Weatherly Institute for Robotics and Engineering, a nonprofit organization that provides robotics and engineering technology education to children and young adults, has announced that it will accept a number of high school students and coach them for three upcoming engineering competitions. The students would not be required to compete in more than one of the competitions, though some may.

The institute will send competitors to The Northeastern Pennsylvania Bridge Building Competition, held at The Viewmont Mall in Dickson City, Pa., on Feb. 12; The Real World Design Challenge, in which students will be asked to design a new jet aircraft wing by Jan. 31; and The FIRST Tech Challenge Robotics Competition.

"Students interested in pursuing science or engineering in college would be well served to show these types of competitions on their résumés," said Stephen Kew-Goodale, executive director of the Institute. "Many public schools are not making it easy, or even possible, for students to get involved in these competitions. We serve to open up these opportunities to more students."

The Weatherly Institute for Robotics and Engineering will host and mentor all three of these engineering design and build teams.

For the past seven years the institute has provided a place from which young men and women have built and designed innovative engineering projects. Currently the institute boasts 14 former members attending various engineering colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Spaces on the teams are limited for these design challenges, so any students interested in learning more about any of these competitions are urged to contact the institute at (570) 401-7813.

The Weatherly Institute for Robotics and Engineering (WIRE) was built on a solid foundation laid down over years by the Weatherly Robotics Club, an organization that has led student competitors in the FIRST robotic competition for five years. The organization is a growing group of youths, young adults, and adult mentors that subscribe to the philosophy of gracious professionalism and the teaching of robotics and engineering technology for younger children and young adults.

It has created a safe, non-violent, program that allows children of all ages to come and learn about the sciences and to express their own creativity while learning new skills. WIRE is a nonprofit organization.

Find out more about the organization on the website at www.weatherlyrobotics.org.