Crooked Still, a Boston-based band which does some Americana, some pure folk, and some old-fashioned bluegrass, has been producing music for nearly 10 years. It's anniversary will be coming up this year.

Founding member Corey DiMario said although the band does extensive traveling - including a tour of Europe - he doesn't expect they'll ever reach the plateau of a Bruce Springstein or Garth Brooks.

"We're lucky to be able to do what we like to do and bring music to our fans," said DiMario, who was waiting out a snowstorm in Newton, Mass.

Tonight, Crooked Still makes a return visit to the Mauch Chunk Opera House in Jim Thorpe for an 8:30 p.m. concert.

DiMario said the band will be doing selections from its newest CD, "Some Strange Country." This is the fourth CD of Crooked Still and was released last May.

"We've been to the Opera House several times," DiMario said. "It's a great venue."

Asked how the band came upon the name Crooked Still, the bassist for the group commented, "It's really not a great story."

He said the banjo player, Gary Liszt, came up with it. The band members were sitting around and trying to come up with a name and originially Liszt suggested "Still Crooked." He said "crooked" suggests that it's a variation from true Americana while "still" presents the image of whiskey.

While together for 10 years, the five-member band has been touring nationally for six of those years. "We first started playing together in Boston in 2001," he said.

He said the original members didn't set out to have a band that would be together for a decade. "It just evolved that way," he noted. "Over the years we kept adding and finding new ways to keep it from falling apart."

There were a few personnel changes in 2008, but the music has remained the same.

Asked what he would consider to be the highlight of the band's tenure, DiMario responded, "So many great things have happened." He settled on the European tour is being at the top of the memorial occasions.

In fact, Crooked Still has a date in Glasgow, Scotland later this month. In March, Crooked Still has a tour in Australia on their agenda.

Other highlights in DiMario's tenure with the band included opening for such great performers as Ricky Skaggs and Tim O'Brien.

Asked about future plans of Crooked Still, DiMario said that he doesn't anticipate major stardom because of the music genre the band performs. Still, he's pleased with the loyal following the band has generated.