Selected masters from the collection of the Anita Shapolsky Art Foundation will open to the public from Sept. 3-Oct. 16 at the foundation, located at 20 W. Broadway in Jim Thorpe.

Featured artists include John Hultberg, Ernest Briggs and Seymour Boardman.

Hultberg was born in Berkeley, Calif. in 1922 and studied at the California School of Fine Arts.

His paintings and prints take viewers through a vortex into compartmentalized apocalyptic and alien lands (often inhabited by demons or otherworldly beings), where occasional uncluttered expanses create windows into the unknown.

His works were very prophetic, with pollution and environment issues.

Hultberg's works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Museum of Modern Art and more.

Briggs was born in San Diego, Calif. in 1923 and studied at the Schaeffer School of Design in San Francisco from 1946-47 and at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco from 1947-51.

He moved to New York in 1953 and taught at the University of Florida, Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and at the Graduate School of Art at Yale University.

Briggs' exhibitions include solo shows dating back to 1949, in galleries ranging from the Metart and Art Association Galleries in San Francisco to Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven to the Howard Wise Gallery, Gruenebaum Gallery and Anita Shapolsky Gallery in New York.

Boardman majored in art at City College, N.Y., from 1938-1942. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1942-46, during which he was hospitalized for over a year due to a wound to his left shoulder, which resulted in partial paralysis of the arm and hand.

After discharge from the service, he left for Paris to continue his art education at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Acadèmie de la Grand Chaumière, and Atelier Fernand Leger. Boardman's work became more abstract but still based on figure and landscape.

He returned to New York in 1949 and went to the Art Students League. He continued to paint dark, moody paintings using a limited palette of black, white, gray, and an occasional additional color.

Throughout the 1960s, Boardman showed at both the Stephen Radich Gallery and the A.M. Sachs Gallery; in 1967, The Whitney Museum and the Guggenheim Museums acquired a painting each. In the early 1970s Boardman had a large exhibition of paintings at the Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art, Cornell University.

Since the mid 1980s, Boardman's work has been exhibited at the Anita Shapolsky Gallery in several one-person and group shows. In 1992, he had an important one-person show at the Anderson Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., and in 1999, a two-person show at the Shapolsky Gallery in New York with the late Richards Ruben.

Boardman passed away on Oct. 3, 2005 at the age of age 84.

Foundation hours are Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and by appointment. For more information visit artsite@ptd.net or call (610) 442-4148.

The Anita Shapolsky Art Foundation was established in 1998 and is home to one of the largest and most historically pertinent collections of American Abstract Expressionism in Pennsylvania.

Also included are works of younger artists in the tradition of Abstract Expressionism. The foundation's 10,000-square-foot exhibition center is located in a historic former church, built in 1849 and containing Tiffany and LaFarge stained glass windows and intricately carved woodwork throughout.