With little more than two weeks before the new Wal-Mart Supercenter is due to open, project engineer Skip Schneider appeared before Mahoning Township supervisors Monday night to inform them there was a minor correction to be made among the deed, the right of way documents and the subdivision plans.

This is more a house keeping task to correcting the minor subdivision and to make sure the documents all are in agreement with each other. The cost of correcting it, Schneider said, would be paid by his client.

"We want to make sure the documents are all in agreement as the deed refers to the wrong document with regard to the right of way and the line on the subdivision marking it needs to be adjusted," Schneider told supervisors.

Besides correcting the deed, the subdivision plans also need a minor adjustment to the line. Schneider said originally the plan given to PennDOT used radial lines to mark the right of way boundary, but they wanted straight lines instead. This resulted in a two foot extra piece of property at one end of the property and a long narrow 16-square foot excess at the other end.

The problem is the land that is dedicated to the township from Wal-Mart to define the right-of-way and that will be turned over to PennDOT. The plan orphans the two square foot and 16-square foot sections of property that will end up being the township's responsibility. To prevent that, Schneider said he wants to slightly move the subdivision lines by filing a supplemental subdivision plan to reclaim those small excesses of property so that what is dedicated to the township is exactly what the township needs to cede to PennDOT for the road right of way.

"I came before you tonight to see if this was the best way to do this and to get your input on what you want us to do to correct this problem," he said.

Township Chairperson John Wieczorek asked Schneider how long he thought this would take. Schneider explained the need for approvals from the county and township planning commissions as well as supervisor approval which could take two months to get resolved.

"Who would pay the costs for the inspections, fees and professional fees to make this correction," Wieczorek asked.

"We are the applicant, so those fees would be paid by my client," Schneider answered.

Planning Commissioner Bruce Steigerwalt, who Schneider thanked for spotting the discrepancy, told the board it was a matter of getting things consistent. "Fifty years from now, you won't want someone trying to figure out what was done with these plans," he commented.

Schneider characterized it as a minor revision to the subdivision plans and Solicitor Tom Nanovic advised the board Schneider's request is not a major issue and that it should not cause any foreseeable problems.

According to Schneider and Nanovic, the paperwork correction should have no impact on Wal-Mart's grand opening.