Hawk Mountain Sanctuary welcomes veritable rock star of the birding world Pete Dunne on Saturday, November 27 at 2 p.m. for a reading and talk on his latest work Bayshore Summer: Finding Eden in a most unlikely place.

This event is free and open to the public and following his talk, Dunne will remain until 4 p.m. to sign books and chat with visitors. Those who wish to purchase Bayshore Summer should call the Mountain Bookstore at (610) 756-6961to reserve a copy.

In the book, Pete describes what he calls "New Jersey's forgotten shore," a secret place found between the tide and the pines, a land of Black Duck and blue mud, salt hay famers and tenth generation watermen. Here, he explains, the natural and cultural heritage of the Delaware Bay shore is as rich as it is unheralded.

The book and talk illustrate how the little-visited area is rich in diversity, and boasts salt marsh, shoreline, and pine barren, each with its accompanying wealth of wildlife and locals who still depend upon it for survival.

A prolific writer and nature historian, Dunne describes fishing for Blue Crabs, making hay from saltmarsh grass, the legendary Jersey tomato, and the predations of the fearsome Greenhead Fly.

Both birders and wildlife enthusiasts alike will appreciate Pete's words and the rich portrait he paints of one of the least known areas of the east coast.

Dunne is the Director of the Cape May Bird Observatory, founder of the World Series of Birding, and a regular columnist for such national publications as American Birds, Birding, Living Bird, Birder's World and WildBird.

Pete is a well known author and co-author of numerous books including Hawks in Flight, Pete Dunne on Birding, Pete Dunne's Essential Field Guide Companion and The Art of Pishing.

Best known for his skills as a hawk watcher, Dunne credits a visit to Hawk Mountain Sanctuary as the trip that inspired him to pursue his career in bird conservation, and since then has delighted in sharing his knowledge of and passion for birds with others.

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is located just seven miles north of I-78/Cabela's intersection, and is known world-wide as the first refuge for birds of prey. Its 2,600 acre sanctuary is open to the public by membership or modest fee for wildlife watching, hiking, enjoying scenic overlooks, or watching the annual raptor migration.

For more information, visit www.hawkmountain.org or call (610) 756-6961.