An eight- or nine-unit housing complex could be the future for a field located at the base of the White Bear hill in Summit Hill.

Last night, Summit Hill Borough Council heard plans for the complex, which would be located at the intersection of Route 902 and White Bear Drive.

A sketch plan was presented to the council by project designer Daniel Poncavage, who said the developer has an option on purchasing the property. The purchase is dependent on the council showing positive reaction to the project.

The developer was identified as Albert Marcella of Lansford. Marcella was not present at the meeting.

The homes would be constructed on an 11-acre tract on the west side of Route 902. The development would be known as Bloomingdale Village.

Poncavage explained that there could be eight houses in the complex, with a small business such as a corner grocery store sitting on the ninth lot. Or, he said, the ninth lot could also be residential.

The council didn't have much discussion on the matter, noting that Marcella will have to produce formal plans to be reviewed.

Councilman William Chapman said he thinks it's "a great idea," but added that the council can't provide input until it has more information.

Poncavage admitted that the land hasn't been "perc tested," which is a percolation test to determine the absorption rate of soil for a septic drain field. He said if the property fails the perc testing, "all these plans could vanish in a puff of smoke."

He told the council that if they can develop eight lots, "it's doable." He said less than eight is "questionable" and five or less would likely be unfeasible.

He said although no municipal water or sewage exists in the area, the developer is considering extending the borough's water line to the complex.

Chief of Police Joe Fittos said the development is proposed at a location where accidents occur.

Poncavage said he is planning the driveways with adequate sight distance.

When Poncavage mentioned the possibility of a small store on the corner of the White Bear and Route 902 intersection, zoning officer Larry Marek said he might find strong objections from residents of the area.

"They want to keep it residential," Marek said.

Marek said that the proposal could help the borough financially.

"From the borough's point of view, it's revenue," said Marek. "It's tax dollars. As long is it's done by borough code."