Members of the Jim Thorpe Borough Council fielded a number of requests for street closings and parking restrictions for upcoming summertime events at its regular monthly meeting on Thursday evening.

All of the requests were approved.

The Fairview Hose Company will host a block party July 30-31. To accommodate the gathering, Jim Thorpe police will close Ninth Street between North and Center streets. South School Street will also be closed about 100 feet on either side of the firehouse.

On July 21-22, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy's 8th Annual Greenway Sojourn, a seven-day, 250-mile bicycle tour through southeast Pennsylvania and New Jersey will include a stop in Jim Thorpe. The 350 riders will be camping in Sam Miller Field. Organizers have asked that parking be restricted on the street directly in front of the park, between the stop sign and the concession stand, so that buses can pick up and drop off the riders.

Jim Thorpe Little League asked the borough for permission to hold its first "Day in the Park" festival at McGarvey's field on Fifth street on Sunday, June 13. The organization has asked the police to close Fifth and Pine streets up the hill toward the cemetery.

Finally, Broadway merchants got one step closer to getting the parking meters reprogrammed in front of their stores, which they say will make their summer more profitable. Last month, Chamber of Commerce member Mike Guy, owner of Rainbow's End, approached the chamber with complaints from shop owners who were having a hard time explaining to local customers why the meters gave them no time for the first quarter.

The borough recently went through a great deal of time and expense to reprogram all of the meters, doubling the cost of parking and requiring users to buy one hour's worth of time for 50 cents before registering any time. At that time, the council handed the matter down to Mayor Michael Sofranko and the police committee for investigation.

At this month's meetings, more chamber members showed up demanding that the council take action at once to change the meters so that one quarter would cover a half-hour of parking. They presented the council with a stack of signed petitions from "every shop owner on Broadway from the bank all the way to the smallest company."

The council seemed willing to make the change as long as the chamber paid to rent the programming tool required to change the meters at a cost of about $350. The council would absorb the cost of the personnel required to do the work.

But before council would take action on the matter, council President Justin Yaich wanted to ask the mayor for his input. Since he wasn't at the meeting, the matter was tabled.