Dear Editor:

We all know that over the many years of our lives that discretion at times is always better road traveled. Charlie Chan the famous detective always said, "Number 1 son do not open mouth and insert foot."

Unfortunately Gen. McChrystal did not heed those words of wisdom. It is very understanding to relate to he and his staff's utter frustration in directing a war run by politicians, especially from a private in the White House. I am not nor have or will ever be a fan of the Obama administration. Especially when those Pinocchio President ears grow every time he [lies.] But we all know you respect the office of the Commander in Chief and not the man. Just consider this is a puppet that uses every missed opportunity as photo opportunity to push up the numbers on the poles. Look at the crisis in the gulf.

This war is at a critical juncture and many U.S. soldiers are and willing to loose their lives over the years that are in the forefront of this conflict. This is especially true when you tell the enemy when you are going to leave.

We are transporting our military weight in vehicles and armament from Iraq to Afghanistan and will ship it to God knows were next.

In a book written by Michael Crichton "The Great Train Robbery." The growing British Empire, when it was called an Empire, had suffered a major set back in then their struggle to rule the world. This was in Kabul Afghanistan, in 1842 that's right on the year, 16,500 British soldiers, women and children were killed maimed and died in six days.

With that slaughter the British return to their homeland. We also know that the Russians also did not have any great claim to success in that country. So here we are with a coalition of our allies trying to destroy an enemy that has been entrenched in the mountain since before 1842 with a tactical plan drafted by Pinocchio.

McChrystal did not help but hinder our cause for success in this conflict and I pray that Gen Petraeus can stand and defend the American fighting forces and smooth over the divisions that led to his predecessor's dismissal.

From the pen of K. Treger

Lehighton