The 11th annual 4-H livestock auction was held at the Carbon County Fair on Saturday. The animals are to be picked up today when the fair is over.

The Pledge of Allegiance and 4-H pledge opened the event.

Mindy Graver, mistress of ceremonies, announced the good housekeeping awards. Prizes were gift certificates good for food at the fair stands - first place with a $15 certificate was Andy Fogel, second was Vanessa Hyska ($10) and third, Luke Graver ($5).

Mindy Graver thanked everyone who helped make the week a success, including the three Carbon County commissioners who support the 4-H program all year: Wayne Nothstein, Charles Getz and Bill O'Gurek.

She thanked the fair directors for use of the site for the roundup and livestock sale.

Many of the animals were purchased on a buy-back basis. Each animal is given a market value. If the high bidder does not intend to take the animal home, the buyer pays the difference between the market value and the final bid.

It was noted that Tim Houser had been the auctioneer for 35 years. Diane Miller-Graver read biographies of the 4-H'ers as they entered the arena.

As Luke Graver entered with the first animal, the grand champion market steer, Houser said he remembered Graver from the time he was this (waist) high. He named him Cool Hand Luke. The purchaser was Fast Fill Exxon. Accepting the banner were Michael, Victoria and Thomas Fegely. Market value for the steer was $1,046 and the high bid was $1,725.

The grand champion dairy beef animal was entered by Sarah Kuehner. It had a market value of $417 and a high bid from Hometown Farmers Market of $1,950. Houser accepted the banner for Hometown.

He asked Luke Graver if he stayed up all night curling the tail on his swine grand champion. Carbon County Commissioner Charles Getz bid $800 for the animal which had a market value of $151.

Melissa Nothstein showed the grand champion market goat. Houser said Nothstein plans to become a farmer. Tracy and Tom Creed, who were first-time buyers at the auction, bought the goat for $1,500. It had a market value of $75.

Commissioner Getz placed the high bid of $1,550 for the market lamb, which was valued at $86. Luke Graver was the exhibitor.

Liana Dages carried her grand champion rabbits in a basket. Houser asked her if it was a Longenberger basket. One of the rabbits jumped out of the basket. The high bid of $340 was from Dean Arner of Pine Hill Lawns and Soil.

There is no market value given for rabbits and chickens because there is no buy-back.

An Australorp pair of chickens was sold for $360 to the Carbon County Fair. Director Bob Silliman collected the grand champion banner.

Forest Inn Storage bought the Buff Laced Polish pair of chickens for $580. They were exhibited by Carissa Sevrin . She said her cow project animal stepped on her foot. When she fell she broke some teeth.

Houser said the audience should take a real long look at the people who were supporting the kids by paying more than market value.

Mindy Graver said the premium reimbursement was cut in half by the state and in half again this year. Some quilt squares were formed into runners with the theme Pennsylvania's Finest. They were sold with the proceeds going to premium reimbursement. The first one had an apple design and sold for $300 to Countryside Acres. Another one brought $210 from Danadee Miller.

Vanessa Hyska's reserve champion market steer with a market value of $1,392 sold for $2,000 to Chester of Charles S. Snyder Inc., a long-time supporter.

Carissa Sevrin's dairy beef with a market value of $446 sold for $1,725 to Charles S. Snyder Inc.

Luke Graver's swine with a market value of $151 sold to Pencor for $860.

Randy Hoffman's goat sold for $1,020 to Clark Shoenberger of Gap View Farms. Market value is $75. Shoenberger is another long-time supporter of 4-H.

The reserve champion lamb sold for $710 to Forest Inn Masonry. Market value is $83.

Cade Miller's meat pen of rabbits sold for $320 to Carbon County Commissioner Wayne Nothstein and Donna.

After the champions and reserves were sold other exhibited animals were auctioned. The steer went for $1,600 and the 13 dairy beef sold for between $625 and $925.

Each exhibitor included in their biography what they would change with next year's project. They are looking ahead to another project and another fair.