Students who attend school in the Jim Thorpe Area School District will return to school after the summer looking sharp and professional, according to the district's board of education.

The board, on the recommendation of the school's administration and a dress code committee, voted to adopt a new code during its meeting on Monday night, with the understanding that some additional work remains to be done.

For the 2010-2011 school year, students will be expected to set aside their ripped jeans and T-shirts in favor of polo shirts or sweaters and Docker-style pants or skirts. While there is some flexibility in the kinds of tops and bottoms students can wear, the end result will be a neater, more professional looking student body, according to district Superintendent Barbara Conway.

Acceptable tops include short or long sleeve polo shirts (with 2 or 3 buttons), a standard dress shirt that is tucked in, a turtleneck, pullover or full torso cardigan sweater. Students can also wear a suit or sport coat. Tops must be navy blue, royal blue, red or white.

Bottoms can be dress or casual Docker-style pants or shorts, dress or casual capri-style pants, dress or casual skirts or skorts. Bottoms must be navy blue, black or khaki (tan/stone) in solid colors.

Students will be expected to come to school next year in appropriate clothing. Parents will have a range of choices and can spend as little as $3.99 for a polo shirt through a uniform outlet, $25 for a similar shirt at Old Navy or much more at a high end specialty store such as Hollister or Abercrombie & Fitch.

"I want to take this moment to thank all of the people who worked with me on the dress code committee," said L.B. Morris assistant Superintendent Dave McAndrew Jr. "They did a great job."

"I don't know that the documents we have seen spell out who is responsible for enforcing this code," said board member Randall Smith. "I think we need something in a policy statement that puts down in black and white what the teacher should do in case of a violation."

Smith, who voted in favor of the dress code, pushed for a stipulation that the final code would include details regarding enforcement. The motion passed.