There was good news and bad news regarding Summit Hill borough's new buildings last night.

The good news:

Ÿ Dedication can finally occur for a two-year-old fire truck and new fire station. Shawn Hoben, fire chief, said the dedication will be held on Saturday, July 24.

Ÿ Monica Marshall, Recreation Commission treasurer, said the Community Center is ready for usage. She said all that's needed is for the council to provide a contract that groups using the center would sign.

Attorney Joseph Matika, the borough's solicitor, said he will put together a sample contract that the council can review within a week or two.

Now the bad news.

Extensive repairs might be needed for the heating and air conditioning systems in the borough hall and fire company building.

The borough hall has been occupied for less than three years and the fire department took occupancy of its station only a couple of months ago. Michael Kokinda, a member of the council, said it doesn't appear the system was properly installed.

Kokinda said that "through temporary repairs," the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air condition) system is working. To get it to function properly, repair work must be placed out on bids.

Attorney Matika urged that the council come up with a list of specific repairs needed before the bidding occurs. Some council members were concerned this might involve the expense of hiring an engineering firm to review the project.

"Isn't it under warranty?" asked council member William Chapman.

Kokinda said there is potential for litigation.

Chapman then suggested that the council wait until the litigation is resolved before the work occurs.

Attorney Matika said particulars about potential litigation must be discussed by the council. In addition, Kokinda said a lot of money is being lost on heat and air conditioning because the HVAC system isn't working efficiently. "We must get it repaired," he said.

The solicitor said original specifications can't be used for the repairs because change orders had occurred. "There have been multiple fixes to the original contract," he said.

Kokinda suggested that a contractor could look at the original design, compare it with the change orders, and then determine what's needed to repair the system. Attorney Matika urged that specific instructions regarding repairs be compiled.