It's been nothing short of a treasure trove for those fortunate enough to swing their nine-irons.

Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Mountains, the Old Homestead Golf Club in New Tripoli is a real sight to behold.

Flanked by a restored 1910 farmhouse, a 1700s summer kitchen with bake oven, a one-room schoolhouse, a drive-thru corn crib, and a horse-drawn carriage museum, the club is located on about 250 acres at 6598 Route 309.

In recognition of the significant role it plays in the community, the club has been recognized as Business of the Month by the Greater Northern Lehigh Chamber of Commerce.

Justin Smith, general manager, said the club is grateful for the accolade.

"It's certainly nice to be recognized, and certainly appreciated," Smith said. "There's many other businesses out there today that are working very hard, and it's nice to know your efforts are being recognized."

Smith said the club opened in 1995. Two holes were added to the original 18-hole course. Then, in 2002, a 9-hole, par 3 course was added.

At present, the club is a partner in the Preferred Golf Membership, along with the Center Valley Club in Center Valley, the club at Morgan Hill in Easton, and Hideaway Hills Golf Club in Kresgeville.

"It's a new concept in this area," he said. "It has helped to grow our rounds."

The club is owned by Justin's parents, Glen and Sally Smith.

"They've given me full authority to run the club as I see fit," he said. "It was very nice of them to put that trust in me to be there to run things."

The club, which features about 65 employees, is open from dusk to dawn.

Patrons who frequent the club routinely compliment its staff, with which Smith referred to as being "customer-focused."

"The course itself is phenomenal from the aspect that there are 18 uniquely different holes that have great character," he said. "There's no dull holes, which can be attributed to the piece of land we had to carve the course out."

Smith was quick to credit his staff for their dedicated work.

"I'd like to say thank you to the staff and my managers who open early and don't close until late," he said. "They work very hard, and they're the ones who put the course in good condition so that we can grow and keep our customers happy."