Sunday was a fine day for a picnic and David, Sr. and Charmane Beers had a good reason to have one. Their son, David Beers, Jr., had earned his Eagle badge and the court of honor was held at their Towamensing home. Friends and family were invited to remain for a picnic and visit as long as they wanted.

Scout committee member Tim Beltz said the gathering was to honor David Beers, Jr. as he joins the brotherhood of Eagle Scouts.

The colors were presented by Jarrett Kleintop, Ryan Kleintop and Ken Dixon.

During the invocation Dusty Kresge prayed: "Use this ceremony to inspire vision and to encourage others to follow the Eagle path."

Rick Anderson, council representative, said the court of honor was convened only to present the Eagle Scout award to Beers.

Leslie Dixon escorted Beers to the front of the gathering..

Frank Lesko, scoutmaster, gave the requirements for Eagle. He said badges did not show what Beers had done but what he can do now. Beers earned the required 12 merit badges plus nine elective badges. He spent 13 hours on service projects and completed an Eagle project by making six picnic tables with benches for Palmerton Rod and Gun Club in appreciation for the club helping scouting.

Beers completed 325 requirements in all.

He worked several weekends for Jim Everett at Country Junction and received a donation of the wood for the picnic tables in return.

He knows how to camp, swim, hike, use wood tools, build a fire, cook outdoors and use a map and compass. He is comfortable with nature and can identify local plants and animals. Beers developed a project to solve an environmental problem.

He knows how to meet emergency situations and is a good citizen. He knows who his local, state and federal representatives are, and read the Declaration of Independence and Constitution.

Beers has learned how to manage finances and meet fitness goals.

Lesko, looking up from his script, said, "I call that pretty well prepared. There are more challenges and pressures today because of the world we live in."

Ryan Kleintop was the Voice of the Eagle. He told Beers to look back to when he first joined Boy Scouts. He felt small but soon began to advance, watched by the eagle on high. Beers began the climb toward Eagle, and the climb became harder. After he earned his Life Scout award, the eagle knew he would continue till he received his Eagle.

One verse of a poem read by Nadine Kleintop reads, "But three years have gone as he struggled along, to learn what the Scout Law's about, and he practiced daily, that Oath and that Law, until now - he's an Eagle Scout."

Beers, along with Eagles in the audience repeated the Eagle Scout Promise that supercedes the scout oath.

Dixon escorted David, Sr. and Charmane, Beers' parents, to the front.

Bieling said Beers' mother made many sacrifices for him, so she was asked to pin his Eagle medal on his uniform. In turn he presented her with a mother's Eagle pin.

His father was a source of advice and guidance and as such was asked to present the Eagle Scout certificate.

Bieling presented Beers as Troop 209's newest Eagle.

Ryan Kleintop said Beers had climbed the Eagle mountain and he should continue through life in the same manner taking a step at a time and blazing his own trail when there was none to follow.

Beers received a small decorative box with the date 7-16-09, the date he actually earned Eagle, and a flag flown over the capitol in Harrisburg on that date. A proclamation was presented from Rep. Keith McCall.

Beers presented flowers to Nadine Kleintop, Leslie Dixon, and both sets of grandparents, Wip and Marie Beers and Gary and Linda Stroup.

The men who mentored him on the Eagle Trail were presented with mentoring pins. They went to Fred Lesko, Dave Bieling, Gary Kleintop and Rick Anderson.

The colors were retired and the picnic began.