Three hundred cars were at last year's Dream Come True Benefit Festival and Car Show, but this year's show, held last weekend, also were parking in an overflow parking lot filling it. The show is popular with car owners such as Donald Butz of Danielsville and Russell Wambold, Jr. of Lynnport.

Butz said he had made a 2008 Mustang into the kind of car he wants and that made it a show car regardless of date. He also shows a 1979 Camaro which belonged to his wife since it was new.

"I don't collect cars. I drive them," said Butz.

Wambold and Rehrig had a black 1949 Ford pickup truck and a 1953 Ford four-door car. The 1953 was purchased in Normal Square and has only 46,000 miles on it.

"We come every year but bring different cars," said Rehrig.

Wanda Strohl and the Blue Ridge Rod and Custom Car Club organize the show portion of the festival.

Cindy Beck, who organizes the festival and show said she has been doing it with the help of many volunteers for 20 years now.

The first few years it benefited a certain child's dream but now the funds are donated to the Dream Come True, Blue Ridge Chapter.

"It's really great. We started with 20 cars and it expanded every year," Beck said. Her family is owner of Becky's Drive In where the festival is held.

In addition to cars there is a flea and craft market. This year it had 40 vendors.

Beck said it is hard to get started with the planning but on the day of the event it is worth it. A lot of organizations come out and contribute such as the Lehigh Township Lions and Lioness clubs, Lehigh Township Fire Company, St. Paul's United Church of Christ, Boy and Cub Scouts, Lehigh Township Police with the Child ID program, Lehigh Elementary School sixth graders and community service people.

She said a lot of the volunteers come every year and look forward to it.

Because there was a movie shown on Saturday night, employees picked up trash at midnight to be ready for the festival.

In 2008 Beck said they earned $10,000 for Dream Come True and over the 20 years a total of $183,000 was raised.

John and Jacob Holland, who were showing antique engines, had a sign out thanking the people who made their dream possible. They have a syndrome that is causing them to lose vision.

The boys' dream was a trip through the western part of the country. Among the sites visited were the petrified forest, painted desert, Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Salt Lake City and Denver where John wanted his picture taken at the Broncos' stadium. He is a fan.

Their mother described it as a whirlwind tour. Five family members accompanied the two boys on the trip.

Kim Tyack had greyhounds that had come off the track. She was showing how adaptable they are. First Greys is seeking homes for the dogs. She said most of them come from Florida where there are a lot of dog racing tracks. They are fostered until they become familiar with life in a home. For information check the Web at www.firstgreys.org.

The seventh annual Tech-Net Professional Auto Service group sponsors a comedy night Dream Come True fundraiser at Penn's Peak on Nov. 7. They were selling raffle tickets for such items as a lawn mower and a large grill. For information call (800) 262-5504.

Scouts from Troop 15 were selling peach cobbler made in a Dutch oven. They even burn their own wood to make the coals to cook the cobbler.

Members of the Lehigh Township Fire Company were displaying their pumper that carries much of their equipment. The Northampton County Emergency Management Mobile Command Center was also on display.

It was a day for music and fun with activities for the children along the Pumpkin Lane a great event with people coming year after year and enjoying it, according to their comments.