For over eight years, family members and friends of victims of the 9/11/01 terrorist attacks have been trying to heal from the emotional and psychological pain of that dark day in American history.

Many will never experience a total healing in their lifetimes.

A decision by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to have Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, and four of his cohorts, tried in New York City, may reopen the wounds when that trial plays out in front of the world.

One of the big critics of having a trial in New York City is former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who feels that the venue would only provide suspects with a platform to spout their radical jihadists views. For Terrorist Number 1 – Osama bin Laden – his radical beliefs will be on a world stage with the publicity these radicals will receive, and he won't have to spend a dime for the exposure.

Giuliani is one voice of authority which Holder, the Obama administration and other Democratic leaders should listen to. The former mayor received praise for his calm and leadership abilities at one of the most critical times in U.S. history – during and immediately after the 9/11 attacks.

Giuliani and many other Republicans feel that the five suspects should be tried in military tribunals as war criminals, along with other detainees at Guantánamo, Cuba. The former mayor says that moving the case to a civilian court shows "an overconcern with the rights of terrorists and a lack of concern for the rights of the public."

Many who lost loved ones when the World Trade Center towers fell that day support Giuliani's opposition to bringing the trial to New York City. Because the trial is sure to drag on for months and probably years, there will be no relief from reminding Americans – and especially New Yorkers – of that dark day.

The whole circuslike atmosphere of such a trial – the increased security, the blocking of streets and the 24/7 international news coverage – will only reopen old wounds for those who lost loved ones in the attacks

Holder and the Obama administration should first listen to these people – the survivors who must live with the events of 9/11 for the rest of their lives – before providing the city as the stage to try these villains.

If he's still alive, Osama bin Laden must feel satisfied that America is providing a platform for his radical buddies to spew their venom.

By Jim Zbick

jzbick@tnonline.com